A quick reminder that it really is all about you!

Caregiver Self-Advocacy: Four Messages to Live By

1. Choose to take charge of your life.

We fall into caregiving often because of an unexpected event, but somewhere along the line you need to step back and consciously say, “I choose to take on this caregiving role.” It goes a long way toward eliminating the feeling of being a victim.

2. Love, honor and value yourself.

Self care isn’t a luxury. It is your right as a human being. Step back and recognize just how extraordinary you are, and remember your own good health is the very best present you can give your loved one.

3. Seek, accept and at times demand help.

Caregiving, especially at its most intense levels, is definitely more than a one person job. Asking for help is a sign of your strength and an acknowledgement of your abilities and your limitations.

4. Stand up and be counted.

Recognize that caregiving comes on top of being a parent, a child, a spouse. Honor your caregiving role and speak up for your well-deserved recognition and rights. Become your own advocate, both within your own immediate caregiving sphere and beyond.

© National Family Caregivers Association (now CaregiverActionNetwork) www.nfcacares.org 800/896-3650

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