A quick reminder that it really is all about you!

Caregiver Self-Advocacy: Four Messages to Live By

1. Choose to take charge of your life.

We fall into caregiving often because of an unexpected event, but somewhere along the line you need to step back and consciously say, “I choose to take on this caregiving role.” It goes a long way toward eliminating the feeling of being a victim.

2. Love, honor and value yourself.

Self care isn’t a luxury. It is your right as a human being. Step back and recognize just how extraordinary you are, and remember your own good health is the very best present you can give your loved one.

3. Seek, accept and at times demand help.

Caregiving, especially at its most intense levels, is definitely more than a one person job. Asking for help is a sign of your strength and an acknowledgement of your abilities and your limitations.

4. Stand up and be counted.

Recognize that caregiving comes on top of being a parent, a child, a spouse. Honor your caregiving role and speak up for your well-deserved recognition and rights. Become your own advocate, both within your own immediate caregiving sphere and beyond.

© National Family Caregivers Association (now CaregiverActionNetwork) www.nfcacares.org 800/896-3650

New & Noteworthy
Alzheimer’s disease directly affects parts of the brain responsible for communication. Patients find it harder to both understand others and explain themselves. Patients also begin to forget the names of once familiar objects such as watches or pens. Early in the disease, people with Alzheimer’s are often able to hide
From Alzheimer’s Reading Room The caregiver begins to acquire empathy by asking how, why, what. How is the person who is deeply forgetful feeling? Why is the person who is deeply forgetful acting this way? What do they need? Learning How to Communicate with Someone Living with Alzheimer’s The only way the
Celebrations don’t need to end or even dim because someone has dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.  Even after the death of a loved one, I believe that, on special occasions , such as Valentine’s Day, pretending it isn’t happening just dishonors that the love ever existed. So what do you do
2017 © The Leeza Gibbons Memory Foundation