Doctor’s Office Checklist

You may want to accompany your care recipient to doctor’s appointments. This way, you and your care recipient can work together as members of the health care team and ensure that you both understand the recommended medical course of action. This is an especially important role if your care recipient is cognitively impaired.

A checklist is a great tool to keep track of what happened at a doctor’s appointment and to help you organize information for upcoming appointments in order to get the most out of your time with your doctor.  Here is a checklist from our friends at caregiveraction.org to help you make the most of your doctor’s visit:

Doctor’s Office Visit Checklist

Before the Visit

• Write down all questions or any concerns you might have so you don’t forget them. This will help you state them clearly. Regardless of how insignificant you feel the doctor may think it is– ASK!
• Identify current symptoms. Use the following handy symptom-reporting guide.
• Update the patient file and medication list. Be sure to include all medications, over the counter drugs and supplements.
• Call to confirm appointment

During the Visit

• Bring the updated medication list
• Clearly report all of your loved one’s symptoms; don’t try to diagnose the problem.
• Ask your questions and record the answers
• Record doctor’s instructions
• Discuss recommendations
• Verify follow-up

After the Visit

• Review your notes
• Check prescriptions
• Discuss the visit
• Update your calendar
• Call for test results

New & Noteworthy
The Irmo News: Dr. Carlos W. Gibbons has been awarded the 2016 Poet of the Year Award by the PoetryFest Foundation. Gibbons has a poem in the 2016 PoetryFest Publication, “On the Wings of Angels,” and has been cited as one of PoetryFest’s brightest poetry stars. Gibbons is a native
Leeza Gibbons knows firsthand of the devastation that Alzheimer’s disease can cause a family. After the loss of her grandmother and the diagnosis of her mother, Leeza and her family created the Leeza Gibbons Memory Foundation to meet the growing needs of those impacted by memory disorders. Interviewed by Winn
Alzheimer’s disease directly affects parts of the brain responsible for communication. Patients find it harder to both understand others and explain themselves. Patients also begin to forget the names of once familiar objects such as watches or pens. Early in the disease, people with Alzheimer’s are often able to hide
2017 © The Leeza Gibbons Memory Foundation