Elder Law Attorneys

You can complete certain legal documents without a lawyer, but getting legal advice and services from a board certified Elder Law attorney who specializes in elder law can be especially helpful. A board certification assures the public that they attorney has substantial experience and demonstrated special knowledge, skills and proficiency in certified areas of practice and professionalism and ethics in the practice of law.

What To Bring To The Lawyer

Gather all documents relating to the assets so you can bring them to your appointment.

Itemized list of assets (e.g., bank accounts, contents of safe deposit boxes, vehicles, real estate, etc.), including current value and the names listed as owners, account holders and beneficiaries

Copies of all estate planning documents, including wills, trusts and powers of attorney

Copies of all deeds to real estate

Copies of recent income tax returns

Life insurance policies and cash values of policies

Health insurance policies or benefits booklets

Admission agreements to any health care facilities

List of names, addresses and telephone numbers of those involved, including family members, domestic partners and caregivers, as well as financial planners and/or accountants

Finding An Elder Law Attorney

Call Your Local Leeza’s Care Connection Program Director or Use one of the following resources:

• Online directory of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys
• Visit Eldercare Locator online or call 800 677 1116
• Visit LawHelp.org to learn about free or reduced cost legal aid programs in your community

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