Government Benefits

Locating Free or Subsidized Health Care Services and Prescription Medications

Extra Help ssa.gov/prescriptionhelp
Medicare beneficiaries can qualify for Extra Help with their Medicare prescription drug plan. Extra Help is estimated to be worth about $4,000 per year. To qualify for Extra Help, a person must be on Medicare, have limited income and resources, and reside in one of the 50 states or the District of Columbia.

Federally-funded health centers findahealthcenter.hrsa.gov
Provide care for individuals, even if they have no health insurance. You pay what you can afford, based on your income.

Medicare.gov medicare.gov/pharmaceutical-assistance-program
The official U.S. government site for Medicare has listings of pharmaceutical company assistance programs by drug name.

National Association of Free Clinics freeclinics.us
Find a free clinic near you.

Needy Meds needymeds.org
Free updated information on patient assistance programs.

Partnership for Prescription Assistance pparx.org
Helps qualifying patients without prescription drug coverage get the medicines they need for free or nearly free.

RX Assist rxassist.org
Offers a comprehensive database of patient assistance programs.

RX Hope rxhope.com
Helps people in need in obtaining critical medications that they would normally have trouble affording.

Together RX togetherrxaccess.com
Together Rx Access® Card can save cardholders 25–40 percent on brand-name prescription products. Savings are available on generic drugs as well.

New & Noteworthy
Don’t neglect your own health when taking care of others. Caregiving is a role that takes many people by surprise. The financial and emotional toll of assisting a sick or aging loved one seems to rise every year, according to several studies. Now, an estimated 90 million Americans provide unpaid caregiving that
eCareDiary spoke to Leeza Gibbons, Emmy-award winner, social entrepreneur and founder of Leeza’s Care Connection about tips to tackle caregiver burnout and creating a balance between family, work and caregiving.    
We must educate our students to participate.  For students to be most effective in civic engagement, they must first learn about the issues from the experts. Teens can then plan effectively to address real-world problems facing our communities.  ACTION uses our combined lunch and homeroom hour for Lunch & Learn
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