Inspiration from Other Caregivers

Sometimes, the best kind of inspiration and support comes from those who have walked a similar path. We believe that a HUG – from a friend or family member can help get you through life’s toughest moments can’t they? That’s what we’ve noticed in the ten years since we’ve been observing our communities of caregivers.

What we’ve learned from all of you is this: the best person to help guide a new caregiver along the path is someone who has walked it before. That’s why we are proud to introduce a new program called HUGS Ambassadors that is a peer-to-peer support circle that allows those who’ve “been there; done that” to lift and encourage those who may be lost and afraid, still asking themselves, “Now What?” after a diagnosis.

Very soon we’ll be adding this service to help our friends and neighbors. In the meantime, read some inspiring stories and poems below. We hope they inspire you as you continue on your caregiving journey.

 


 

Where’s Mother?

Where’s Mother?  Sitting quietly in her chair.
Eyes once alert, now dull and vacant.
Hands once busy, lie folded in her lap.
A mind that once composed poetry,
has forgotten the words.
A voice once full of song,
no longer speaks at all.
She walks with help.
She eats when fed.
She sleeps when put to bed.
Sometimes she smiles.
Sometimes she’s fearful.
Alzheimer’s
“A cure” is what I pray.
For it sneaked in.
And slowly stole my mother away.

~ Della Jean Shipley

New & Noteworthy
Alzheimer’s disease directly affects parts of the brain responsible for communication. Patients find it harder to both understand others and explain themselves. Patients also begin to forget the names of once familiar objects such as watches or pens. Early in the disease, people with Alzheimer’s are often able to hide
From Alzheimer’s Reading Room The caregiver begins to acquire empathy by asking how, why, what. How is the person who is deeply forgetful feeling? Why is the person who is deeply forgetful acting this way? What do they need? Learning How to Communicate with Someone Living with Alzheimer’s The only way the
Celebrations don’t need to end or even dim because someone has dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.  Even after the death of a loved one, I believe that, on special occasions , such as Valentine’s Day, pretending it isn’t happening just dishonors that the love ever existed. So what do you do
2017 © The Leeza Gibbons Memory Foundation