Leeza’s Care Connection Program Director

Each Leeza’s Care Connection is managed by a Program and Outreach Director, an Assistant Director and very often a core of volunteers. Our Directors are trained to be really good listeners, to coach, counsel and guide caregivers through this most challenging time of your life.  Whether you are new to caregiving or have been caring for your family member for years, our team is your team.  We are here to hold your hand and support you every step of the way. Our directors are knowledgeable, accessible and committed to helping each and every family deal with a crisis situation or to manage challenges that arise from day to day caregiving life.

By connecting you to resources, to other caregivers or to your own strength of spirit their expertise will guide you to a better place. Each specially trained director uses their creativity and connections in the community to create programming that is relevant, meaningful educational, supportive and nurturing. It is our hope and goal to make you feel a little stronger, a little lighter and better equipped to handle your daily living once you’ve visited a Leeza’s Care Connection and had the opportunity to interact with other guest and our team of HUG (Helping You Grow) Ambassadors.

For our location in the Los Angeles area CLICK HERE

For our location coming soon to Columbia, SC CLICK HERE

New & Noteworthy
Alzheimer’s disease directly affects parts of the brain responsible for communication. Patients find it harder to both understand others and explain themselves. Patients also begin to forget the names of once familiar objects such as watches or pens. Early in the disease, people with Alzheimer’s are often able to hide
From Alzheimer’s Reading Room The caregiver begins to acquire empathy by asking how, why, what. How is the person who is deeply forgetful feeling? Why is the person who is deeply forgetful acting this way? What do they need? Learning How to Communicate with Someone Living with Alzheimer’s The only way the
Celebrations don’t need to end or even dim because someone has dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.  Even after the death of a loved one, I believe that, on special occasions , such as Valentine’s Day, pretending it isn’t happening just dishonors that the love ever existed. So what do you do
2017 © The Leeza Gibbons Memory Foundation