Leeza’s Care Connection Program Director

Each Leeza’s Care Connection is managed by a Program and Outreach Director, an Assistant Director and very often a core of volunteers. Our Directors are trained to be really good listeners, to coach, counsel and guide caregivers through this most challenging time of your life.  Whether you are new to caregiving or have been caring for your family member for years, our team is your team.  We are here to hold your hand and support you every step of the way. Our directors are knowledgeable, accessible and committed to helping each and every family deal with a crisis situation or to manage challenges that arise from day to day caregiving life.

By connecting you to resources, to other caregivers or to your own strength of spirit their expertise will guide you to a better place. Each specially trained director uses their creativity and connections in the community to create programming that is relevant, meaningful educational, supportive and nurturing. It is our hope and goal to make you feel a little stronger, a little lighter and better equipped to handle your daily living once you’ve visited a Leeza’s Care Connection and had the opportunity to interact with other guest and our team of HUG (Helping You Grow) Ambassadors.

For our location in the Los Angeles area CLICK HERE

For our location coming soon to Columbia, SC CLICK HERE

New & Noteworthy
The Irmo News: Dr. Carlos W. Gibbons has been awarded the 2016 Poet of the Year Award by the PoetryFest Foundation. Gibbons has a poem in the 2016 PoetryFest Publication, “On the Wings of Angels,” and has been cited as one of PoetryFest’s brightest poetry stars. Gibbons is a native
Leeza Gibbons knows firsthand of the devastation that Alzheimer’s disease can cause a family. After the loss of her grandmother and the diagnosis of her mother, Leeza and her family created the Leeza Gibbons Memory Foundation to meet the growing needs of those impacted by memory disorders. Interviewed by Winn
Alzheimer’s disease directly affects parts of the brain responsible for communication. Patients find it harder to both understand others and explain themselves. Patients also begin to forget the names of once familiar objects such as watches or pens. Early in the disease, people with Alzheimer’s are often able to hide
2017 © The Leeza Gibbons Memory Foundation