Medicaid & VA Benefits

The Veteran’s benefit is designed to provide finacial assistance to help cover the cost of long term care in the home, in an Assisted Living Facility or in a Skilled Nursing Home.

The benefit is for Veterans and surviving spouses who require a caregiver in a least two of the Activities of Daily Living (ADLs). Some of those ADLs are dressing, bathing, cooking, eating, grooming, transportation, etc.

This benefit is called Aid and Attendance and a Veteran or a surviving spouse never has to pay it back or pay taxes on it.

There are certain requirements that one has to meet in order to receive this benefit. Some of them are:

1. Must have served at least 90 days of active duty and one of those days must be during war time.

2. Must have anything other than a dishonorable discharge.

3. Surviving spouse must have been married to a Veteran at the time of his/ her passing.

4. Must need assistance with at least two ADLs.

5. Must meet income and asset criteria required by the VA.

6. Must be at least 65 years old or totally disabled.

To learn more about this benefit and other services availabe to you or your loved one, contact a Transitional Services Coordinator at XXXX or  free phone consultation.

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