Medicaid

Medicaid is a federal/state program. It pays for medical care for people who have few assets and very low income..

Who Qualifies: Eligibility and benefits vary from state to state which means each state determines who is eligible. Typically provisions are made for Alzheimer’s and Dementia patients if they are receiving SSI.

How Does Medicaid and long-term care work?  Once qualified, Medicaid covers a large portion of the cost of a skilled nursing facility or nursing home. Each nursing home decides if they will accept Medicaid – so check in with the one that interests you to see if they accept Medicaid. Most states also have home and community care options for people who qualify, which allows individuals to live in their home instead of a skilled nursing facility. These services provide for an individual to receive long term care services while living at home.

How to apply for Medicaid:  Department of Welfare or Department of Health can provide an application or go to Medicaid.gov. Since  Medicaid is based on financial need. you should be ready to provide information about where you live, how much income you get each month, what type of assets you have, etc.

Most nursing homes that accept Medicaid will have staff who can assist you in applying.
Go to Medicaid’s website for more information

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