Questions for The Care Team

Questions for The Care Team

Knowledge is power; especially when it comes to caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s. Listed below are some great questions to ask your loved one’s doctors and caregivers to help you gain the information you need. Use these to start building your questions before you visit medical professionals and other caregivers.

  1. Could the symptoms be due to other reasons besides Alzheimer’s?
  2. What stage of Alzheimer’s is my loved one in?
  3. How can I limit dangers such as falling or wandering away from home?
  4. If my partner has Alzheimer’s, how can we handle changes in our relationship?
  5. Can medications help control some of the symptoms of Alzheimer’s?
  6. What kinds of symptoms should lead me to call the doctor right away?
  7. What types of doctors and other health professionals do I need on the care team?
  8. How can I communciate better with someone with Alzheimer’s if they have trouble understanding?
  9. How can I persuade someone with Alzheimer’s to stop driving if it’s no longer safe for them to get behind the wheel?
  10. How will I know when it’s time for my loved to move into a facility such as a nursing home?
  11. Is there a way to prevent complications of Alzheimer’s, such as skin infections, weight loss, and pneumonia?

 

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2017 © The Leeza Gibbons Memory Foundation